In-take Day

Short but intense day as J. and I did our in-take with the clinic.

Trip to the hospital for x-rays, EKG, and blood tests. Annoyingly the nurse failed to draw enough blood (she was having trouble finding a vein), so I had to go back for a second blood draw.

Then lots of paperwork at Dr. Suporn’s office.

Thanks to the ever-increasing hostile environment in the States towards LGBT people, and trans people in particular, I opted to spend extra getting a notarized statement that I’ve had sexual reassignment surgery.

Hopefully, I’ll never need it, but until only a few years ago, the only way you could get your proper sex listed on your passport was if you had proof of SRS. And given the current administration, I fully expect them to revert back to that requirement — and it wouldn’t surprise me if they attempt to further roll things back to force your passport to show the sex listed on your birth certificated. Which needless to say makes it dangerous for trans people to travel to a number of countries — which is one reason for doing it. Fortunately, California allowed me to update my birth certificate (and the original is sealed), but I wouldn’t put it past the Talibaptists to try to circumvent that as well.

Then it was an exam with Dr. Suporn and Dr. Bank (who will be doing my surgeon under Dr. Suporn’s supervision) to make sure my nether regions had sufficient donor material to be reconstructed into lady parts.

Finally got a look at the dilators 😲😲😲 — they’re far more intimidator to see in person.

TMI details…
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Post-surgery you have to dilate to prevent the neo-vagina from closing up, since to your body it’s essentially a ginormous puncture wound. Most surgeons just have you insert the dilator and leave it there for a half-hour to an hour, but Dr. Suporn has you take a more aggressive approach, which requires you to push against the scar tissue to prevent contracture. Good for maintaining depth, but it hurts. It definitely hurts. Just gotta embrace the suck.

Three times a day for the first three months, twice a day for the next three months, and once a day for another six months until you’re fully healed. (That’s assuming healing goes according to plan. If not, then the frequency can be more for longer.) After that it’s maintenance mode, of at least once a week for the rest of my life.